返回列表 回复 发帖
http://iseek.un.org/webpgdept2145_28.asp

Eighth annual St. Jerome Translation Contest


Posted: Monday, 15 October 2012, New York | Author: Department for General Assembly and Conference Management
To commemorate International Translation Day, which falls on 30 September, the Translation Services of the Department for General Assembly and Conference Management (DGACM) are pleased to announce the launch of the 2012 St. Jerome Translation Contest.

The Contest is open to all current and former United Nations staff members, irrespective of occupational group, contractual status or duty station.

The test piece for contestants translating into English is a Spanish text entitled "Anfiteatro."

The test piece for contestants translating into Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian, Spanish or German is an English text entitled "The British way with umbrellas."

Participants should paste the text of their entry into an e-mail (rather than sending it as an attachment), indicating their name, functional title and duty station.  (Participants who are on short-term contracts are asked to use a personal e-mail address so that they can be contacted later.)  Entries should be submitted to the organizers listed below for each language.  The deadline for submission is Friday, 14 December 2012.

Arabic - Ms. Hala Talaat
Chinese - Mr. Chen Zhongliang
English - Ms. Ann Getzinger
French - Ms. Anne Fassotte
Russian - Mr. Alexandre Toubolets
Spanish - Mr. Manuel Losada-Rodriguez
German - Mr. Frank Schramm

The entries will be evaluated by a panel of two judges for each language.  Judges will pay particular attention to accuracy in conveying the meaning of the source text and to style.  As in previous years, each submission will be identified by a number and not by the name of the contestant in order to ensure anonymity in the selection process.  The winners’ names will not be disclosed until the official announcement at the awards ceremony to be held at UN Headquarters in February 2013.  The exact date and venue will be announced later.

About the St. Jerome Translation Contest

Launched in 2005 by the English Translation Service at Headquarters, the Contest has been held each year to commemorate International Translation Day, which is officially recognized by the International Federation of Translators.  This day (30 September) is the festival of St. Jerome, the patron saint of translators, scholars, editors, interpreters and librarians.
The British way with umbrellas
One of the more prominent features of this sodden British summer has been the
umbrella, unfurled incessantly against the inclemency, and, moreover, starring in the
opening ceremonies of both the Olympics and Paralympics. The latter is a reminder
that the umbrella is unequalled in instantly conjuring the British character in nearly all
of its aspects, including the comic, the cautious and the class-conscious.
Its adoption and popularity here is at once surprising and not. Obviously, and
particularly recently, it does rain quite a lot; but why a country which has prided itself
on no-nonsense practicality should take to such a fussy piece of equipment rather than
rely on hat and cape is not immediately clear.
Jonas Hanway, the umbrella's populariser in Britain, did not have an entirely easy ride
with his novel contraption, having to endure “the contemptuous gestures of his
shocked compatriots” as he strolled about London. It evidently cut no ice that he had
come across the umbrella among rebellious and quite violent tribesmen in Persia.
After all, it's difficult to imagine those brave British forbears at, say, Agincourt
carrying them (the longbow men in particular would have got in quite a tangle).
Against that, though, is the example of Major Allison Digby Tatham-Warter at
Arnhem, who carried one throughout the engagement because, as he explained, he
could never remember passwords and the umbrella would make it perfectly clear he
was British. The key here, I think, is that much proclaimed but elusive native quality,
eccentricity. Nevertheless, the Major disabled an enemy armoured car on at least one
occasion by poking his umbrella through a slit and blinding the driver.
And, of course, there's class. Not a working man's implement, exactly. Even here,
though, and as usual, you have to be careful with the nuances. A friend of mine
(employing an umbrella, as it happens) once encountered a grand acquaintance
dressed in tweed hurrying to his London home through torrential rain, and rather wet.
“Why,” asked my friend, pointing to his own, “no umbrella?” The man looked
shocked. “What, with country clothes?!” I, however, shall continue to use, and fairly
often lose, one, fortified by a fine remark from Major Tatham-Warter when a comrade
counselled caution against a concerted mortar attack: “Don't worry, I've got an
umbrella.”
Charles Nevin
Excerpt from a piece posted by the author on 31 August 2012 on the Editor’s Blog,
moreintelligentlife.com
Link: http://moreintelligentlife.com/b ... -way-with-umbrellas
本帖最后由 bing 于 2013-3-7 23:53 编辑

From Umbrellas to Anfiteatros: Winners of the St. Jerome Translation Contest announced


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posted: Tuesday, 5 March 2013, New York | Author: Department for General Assembly and Conference Management
“One of the more prominent features of this sodden British summer has been the umbrella”.  So begins the piece “The British way with umbrellas” by English author Charles Nevin.   The piece, in which the author muses on the peculiar uses of this quintessentially British implement, was used as a text for the eighth edition of the St. Jerome Translation Contest and was translated by participants into Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian, Spanish and German.  For participants translating into English, the test piece was a text in Spanish entitled “Anfiteatro” by writer and journalist Manuel Vicent.

The winners of the 2012 St. Jerome Translation Contest were announced at a ceremony on Thursday, 21 February 2013.  Five winners, six runners-up and seven honourable mentions were awarded prizes, from a total number of 70 entries received in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, Spanish and German.  Translations were submitted by current and former staff members from New York, Geneva, Vienna and Nairobi, as well as Bangkok, Cairo, Santiago and The Hague.

The ceremony was hosted by Mr. Jean-Jacques Graisse, Acting Head of the Department for General Assembly and Conference Management, who was heartened “to note that the St. Jerome Translation Contest has been a successful means of drawing attention to the vital services we provide to Member States, as we deliver on the General Assembly's mandate concerning multilingualism”.  The Department of Public Information was represented by its Under-Secretary-General, Mr. Peter Launsky-Tieffenthal, who is also the Coordinator for Multilingualism in the Secretariat.  He noted that when his Department reaches out to different entities, multilingualism is often one of the main concerns, which underscores the essential service provided by UN language professionals.

As is traditional at the awards ceremony, the judges for the various languages offered insightful comments on the challenges of the original texts and the renderings produced by the contestants.  Mr. Steven Gleason, a judge for the English segment, said that the Spanish phrase “abanicarse la mandíbula” had been translated in many colourful ways focusing on the anatomy of the human face, with varying degrees of accuracy.  Ranging from the London weather to the distracting beauties of the Russian Translation Service and quoting giants from Moses to Einstein, Mr. Yuri Toropin, representing the Russian segment, explained why he and his fellow judges could not award a first prize to any contestant in that segment.  Mr. Karl Scharf, speaking on behalf of the German judges, drew a witty parallel between the “The British way with umbrellas” and the “delegates’ way with pencils”, and amused the audience with humorous remarks on the various uses of the word “umbrella”.  Winners in the German category were awarded Union Jack umbrellas in a humorous salute to the theme of the piece.

For the next edition later this year, the contest organizers will consider expanding the circle of participants.

_MG_0909a.jpg (2.48 MB)

阅读权限: 10

_MG_0900a.jpg (2.95 MB)

阅读权限: 10

_MG_0782a.jpg (2.56 MB)

阅读权限: 10

_MG_0678a.jpg (2.64 MB)

阅读权限: 10

_MG_0669a.jpg (3.37 MB)

阅读权限: 10

_MG_0641a.jpg (2.25 MB)

阅读权限: 10

_MG_0585a.jpg (2.39 MB)

阅读权限: 10

本帖最后由 bing 于 2013-3-7 23:56 编辑

Department for General Assembly and Conference Management
2012 St. Jerome Translation Contest
Award Ceremony, 21 February 2013
St. Jerome 2012, Winning entries, Chinese Page 1 of 6
Chinese segment
Winner
Xuelun Yang
英国人的用伞之道
英国今年湿漉漉的夏天的一个突出亮点要算雨伞了,不停撑开的伞不
仅为人们遮风挡雨,而且还在奥运会和残奥会开幕式上扮演了主角。
后者使人联想到,雨伞能够瞬间魔术般表现出英国人性格中几乎所有
的特征,无论是滑稽的、谨慎的还是讲究身份的,在这方面非雨伞莫
属。
雨伞在这里从被接受到流行既在意料之外又在情理之中。显然,最近
确实总是连绵多雨;但为什么一个以务实自居的国家偏爱这么一件浮
华的东西胜过帽子和斗篷,就让人一时捉摸不透了。
毕竟,很难想象那些勇敢的英国人祖先,比方说,在阿金库尔战役中
会带着雨伞作战(尤其是长弓手们就会乱作一团)。但有一个与之相
悖的例子,在阿纳姆战役时,阿利森•迪格比•泰瑟姆沃特陆军少校自始
至终携带着一把雨伞,他的理由是,他本人从来都记不住口令,而雨
伞能够明白无误地表明他是英国人。我想,这里关键体现出英国人那
种既尽人皆知又难以言状的古怪禀性。不过,这位少校至少有一次使
一辆敌装甲车陷入瘫痪,他用雨伞刺进了车身上狭长的瞭望孔并扎瞎
了驾驶员。
然而,乔纳斯•汉韦,作为使雨伞在英国流行的人,起初让人们接受这
个新鲜玩意儿时并非一帆风顺,每当他携伞漫步伦敦街头时,总要尴
尬地面对“惊愕的同胞轻蔑的手势”。雨伞是他在波斯地区桀骜不驯的
部落中偶然发现的,但他的同胞显然对此无动于衷。
当然了,还要讲究身份。伞可不是干活儿的人手上的工具,一点不
错。但就算顾及到了身份,你照常还要留意其中的细节。我的一个朋
友(恰巧带了把雨伞)曾经遇到过一位很有身份的熟人,身着斜纹软
呢服穿行在瓢泼大雨中,急匆匆朝伦敦的家赶去,整个一个落汤鸡。
“怎么回事?”我朋友指着自己的雨伞问道:“没带伞?”那人一脸吃惊的
样子反问道:“什么?跟一身乡村服装搭配?!”而伞对我来说,还要
继续用,还会时时丢,有泰瑟姆沃特少校的妙语在为我打气,那是当
少校的战友忠告他提防密集的迫击炮火时少校的回答:“不用担心,我
有雨伞”。



Department for General Assembly and Conference Management
2012 St. Jerome Translation Contest
Award Ceremony, 21 February 2013
St. Jerome 2012, Winning entries, Chinese Page 3 of 6
Chinese segment
Runner-up
Wujun Dai
英国的“伞道”
英国今年夏天潮乎乎的,一道最亮丽的风景线就数雨伞了。只要刮风
下雨, 就会有它的身影。此外,它在奥运会和残奥会开幕式上也占尽
了风头。这后一种情况令人想到,什么东西都无法同伞相比,因为它
总能让人想起英国人近乎方方面面的个性,包括滑稽搞笑、谨小慎微
和讲究品位的一面。
伞在英国的启用和流行既在意料之外又在情理之中。谁都知道,确实
经常下雨,特别是最近。但一个素以干脆利索、讲求实际为荣的国家
何以喜欢上这么一个矫情的工具,而不是戴帽子和斗篷,这就不得而
知了。
令雨伞风靡英伦的乔纳斯·汉威当初推广他的这个新玩意儿实属不易。
他在伦敦四处溜达时,不得不忍受“他的同胞因为震惊而表露的鄙夷神
情”。虽说他是在喜欢造反而且颇具暴力倾向的波斯部落居民那里偶然
间发现雨伞的,但这显然无法说服英国人。
无论如何都难以想象我们那些英姿飒爽的英国先辈——比如说,参加阿
让库尔战役的先辈——打起伞来会是什么样子(特别是持大弓的士兵麻
烦可就大了)。不过,有个相反的例子,就是爱利生·迪格比·塔瑟姆-
沃尔特少校在阿纳姆战役的轶事。他在打仗时始终带着一把伞,因为
据他解释,他从来都记不住口令,但雨伞会让人一看便知他是英国
人。我觉得,这则轶事表达的核心意思就是英国人的性情古怪——这种
民族特性虽被大加宣扬,但却难得一见。不过,这位少校的确至少有
一次把他的雨伞戳入敌军装甲车槽口,弄瞎了驾驶员的眼睛,从而令
装甲车失去作用。
再有,当然就是品位的问题。的确,雨伞不是劳苦大众的家什。然
而,即使在这方面,按照老规矩,都务必讲究细节。我的一个朋友
(碰巧他也用伞)有一次遇到一位身份尊贵的熟人,此人身着花呢
衣,正冒着瓢泼大雨赶往伦敦的家中,快成落汤鸡了。我的朋友就指
着自己的雨伞问,“怎么不打伞呢?”此人震惊地说道,“什么,穿这么
一身土气的衣服还打伞?!”不过,有塔瑟姆-沃尔特少校的妙语给我
壮胆,我会继续打伞,尽管我常常会搞丢。塔瑟姆-沃尔特少校的一
位老兄曾劝他当心碰到万炮齐发的情况,对此,少校说,“甭担心,我
有雨伞呢”。



Department for General Assembly and Conference Management
2012 St. Jerome Translation Contest
Award Ceremony, 21 February 2013
St. Jerome 2012, Winning entries, Chinese Page 5 of 6
Chinese segment
Honourable Mention
Frank Gao
英国人使用雨伞的作派
今年夏天,英国雨水颇多,雨伞成了一种更加引人注目的景象:
风雨来袭时,人们纷纷撑起伞遮挡;甚至在奥运会和残奥会的开幕式
上,雨伞也都登台亮相。后一种情形提醒世人,雨伞最能让人即刻想
起英国人性格的几乎所有方面,包括滑稽、行事谨慎和阶层观念。
雨伞在英国得到接受并流行开来,既令人惊讶,又在情理之中。
显然,这里确实经常下雨,尤其在最近一段时间。然而,在一个崇尚
彻底实用主义的国度,人们为何不用帽子和斗篷遮雨,而是居然喜欢
上雨伞这种过于讲究的器具,个中缘由不是一望便知的。
人们毕竟很难想像出英国人英勇的先辈在阿金库尔战役中携带雨
伞的样子(特别是那些弓箭手,他们肯定会弄得手忙脚乱)。不过,参加
阿纳姆之战的艾利逊·迪格比·泰瑟姆-瓦尔特少校却是这方面的一个反
例。他在纷飞战火中始终手执一把雨伞,而他给出的解释是,那是因
为他总是记不住那些口令,雨伞可以明白无误地表明他是英国人。在
这一点上,我觉得关键还在于那种很令人称道却又捉摸不定的本土
性——怪僻。这位少校倒是至少有一次把雨伞插进敌人装甲车的瞭望
口,戳瞎驾驶员的眼睛,让装甲车动弹不得。
即使如此,乔纳斯·汉韦这位让雨伞在英国流行的始作俑者在使用
自己的新发明时,也并非完全一帆风顺。他在伦敦街头漫步时,不得
不忍受“面露惊色的同胞们作出的不屑姿态”。显然,关于他是在桀骜
不驯而又颇为暴力的波斯部落人那里最先见到雨伞的说法,毫不令人
信服。
当然,还有阶层因素。确切地说,雨伞不是劳动者的用具。即令
在这一点上,通常还必须注意那些细微差别。有一回,我的一位朋友
(他碰巧打着伞)路遇一位颇有地位的熟人。那人穿着花呢衣服,正
冒着倾盆大雨匆匆往伦敦家中赶,身上湿漉漉的。我的朋友指指自己
手中的雨伞,问道:“为什么不打伞呢?”那人露出一脸惊愕。“雨伞配
乡下衣服,这怎么行?!”不过,我会继续使用雨伞,还会不时地丢失
一把,而泰瑟姆-瓦尔特少校的一句豪言壮语也让我倍感鼓舞——有一
次战友提醒他防备迫击炮协同袭击,他回答说:“别担心,我带着伞
呢”。
本帖最后由 bing 于 2016-7-12 00:29 编辑

St. Jerome Translation Contest award ceremony for 2016

https://stjerometranslationcontest.wordpress.com/winners/

(赵伊雯)录相:http://uncbc.org/main/videos/wmvVIDEOS/reward.wmv
返回列表